We <3 Our Volunteers!

scenes from Volunteer Appreciation dinnerCraven Literacy Council celebrated National Literacy Month with a Volunteer Appreciation Dinner on September 13, 2016.  CLC has approximately 125 active tutors and other volunteers who are the heart of the organization.  These volunteers gave almost 13,000 hours to the organization last fiscal year.  They worked with students who needed help with reading, writing, speaking, technology, achieving citizenship, getting a drivers’ license, reading prescription labels, completing job applications and other forms, as well as helping with fundraisers, training new tutors, and raising awareness of adult literacy in our community.

Janet Peregoy was named the Volunteer of the Year for her outstanding service and advocacy of adult literacy in our community.  Four individuals: JoAnn Kerrick, Debi Lupia, Dorothea Neely and Mary Spooner were recognized for their induction into the Grand Club for achieving 1000 lifetime volunteer hours with Craven Literacy Council.

Save

Become a Literacy Tutor

stack of booksWe’re getting ready to begin another new tutor training workshop. If you’ve ever thought about being a literacy tutor, please come to our orientation on July 12. You can register here.

Anyone can be a tutor. You don’t have to be a teacher or have any special skills. If you can read, if you care about helping others, if you can commit to 3-4 hours per week for a couple of months — you can be a tutor.

Craven Literacy Council offers instruction in adult basic English, as well as English as a second language and help preparing for the US citizenship examination. Come to the new tutor training workshop and learn how satisfying it is to give back to your community through tutoring.

From a Student and a Tutor

Why Have a Tutor?
I have an English tutor because it has a lot of benefits. The program is free. Other English programs are very expensive but this program is very good and free. My tutor helps me to read, write, talk and understand the English language. I love having a tutor because it is private instruction or small group. For this reason I feel free to express my thoughts.

One of the benefits I like is the flexibility. It is hard to study when you have kids. For this reason our meetings are when my children are at school.

In conclusion a tutor is a new friend who helps you when you need it. Thank you to my tutor for your patience. Without you everything I achieved would not be possible.

And a note from our tutor:
She was my English student for approximately 1 1/2 years. She is married to a U.S. Marine stationed at Cherry Point. They have two young children. This was her first time living in the United States. Her native country is Puerto Rico. She made great progress learning English.

It is very rewarding to develop a tutor/student relationship and I highly encourage others to reach out and teach!

We are beginning out next new tutor training workshop in April. Click here to register or for more information.

We Are All “Learning for Life”

Here at Craven Literacy we live our tag line “Learning for Life”. Not only do we require 15 hours of training for new tutors, we offer several workshops throughout the year for current tutors. These sessions present new ideas about tutoring techniques and offer a chance for interaction among tutors. Sharing the same goals with others who may face the same challenges helps tutors to stay positive and motivated, and committed tutors make for learning success for our adult learners.

tutors at workshopOur latest workshop about test taking strategies was so well-attended that we had to offer 3 sessions. In each session our trainers demonstrated practice lesson activities and provided review study guides for student use. Review is  important even to students who may not be taking tests, so these strategies can help any student achieve his or her goals.

Visit this website to learn some creative and helpful ways to review learned material.

Calling All Tutors

Registration is now open for Craven Literacy’s new tutor training workshop beginning April 12. We have a steady stream of adults coming to our office  for help with their literacy skills. Literacy, of course, starts with reading. But today it is so much more.

The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 defines literacy as “an individual’s ability to read, write, speak in English, compute and solve problems at levels of proficiency necessary to function on the job, in the family of the individual and in society.”

This broader view of literacy reflects the realities of education and work in the 21st century. As information and technology have increasingly shaped our society, the skills we need to function successfully have gone beyond reading.

The tutoring opportunities are many and varied. Please consider attending the first session of the workshop for an orientation to the clients we serve and the services they need.

Welcome, New Literacy Tutors!

Craven Literacy Council announces that 13 new tutors participated in the new tutor workshop ending on January 28, 2016. These individuals are currently being paired with a student. The next workshop begins April 12. When you see a new face in the hallway, please give them a warm welcome!

Jan 2016 tutor classPictured L-R, 1st Row: Lynda Ahmed, Maggie Nicholson, Pamela Collier, Barbara Haan, Augusta Jackson, Kathy Carter, John Sickles
2nd Row: Patrick Feury, Bernie Frank, John Shipherd, Jan Ecklund, Tim Fisher, Sammie Caswell

Learning to Read at 48

Earl Mills is one of CLC’s biggest literacy success stories and now one of our biggest boosters. Earl raised a family and enjoyed 30 years of successful employment in New Bern, NC – all while hiding a secret from his children and his employer: he could barely read.  In his 40’s Earl finally turned to Craven Literacy Council for help.

open bookNow a published author and frequent inspirational speaker, Earl tells his story to others, vividly conveying the fear that came with hiding this secret throughout his adult life.  He also shares the sheer determination it took for him to become a reader.

Read more of Earl’s story here in the New Bern SunJournal.