Partnering for a Stronger Community

Craven Literacy Council is actively building partnerships with other local organizations. Since we share the goal of helping local adults improve their lives, it makes sense for us to work together. Leveraging our services and resources should bring success  to more people. We look forward to continuing our works with the fine people at these organizations and others like them:

  • Mount Olive College shares their space during the day for tutoring and also lets us host tutor training workshops in their large and modern classrooms.
  • Housing Authority of the City of New Bern, dedicated to the community who live at Craven Terrace and Trent Court, have sent a few of their employees to our last New Tutor Training, and they have invited us to use their office space for tutoring.
  • Interfaith Refugee Ministry (IRM), helping acclimate families to New Bern and the American way of life, is sharing curriculum materials.
  • Uptown Business and Professional Association, working with individuals who want their G.E.D., have an impressive new computer lab to help their students achieve their dreams and goals.
  • Craven Community College is talking with us about how we can help adults access both the campus and the Literacy Council to help them reach their potential. Additionally, the library on campus (Barker Hall) is now available for tutoring space.
  • NC Works! has a few study cubicles we can use for tutoring space, and they offer other services for our students such as a computer lab for job and career exploration.

Funding for Literacy and a Better Workforce

WIOA logoCraven Literacy Council, like most of its sister organizations, gets a substantial portion of its operating revenue from grants. The largest source of our grant funding comes through the federal government’s Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act-Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (WIOA-AEFLA) and is administered by the NC Community College System (NCCCS). In their memo to NC literacy associations, the NCCCS states:

The WIOA-AEFLA provides adult education and literacy services to help adults obtain employment and economic self-sufficiency, and support the educational development of their children.  It also prepares adults to earn a high school diploma or equivalency and to prepare them for transition to post-secondary education through career pathways.  AEFLA continues to serve English language learners improve their English language skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking and expands the scope of services to include mathematics and civic related-purposes.

New for the upcoming funding year to begin July 2017 is heightened emphasis on job readiness and post-secondary education. These laudable goals will present challenges to us and other community-based literacy associations. With many of our learners starting at not even a high school reading level, making the gains necessary to be work- or college-ready takes time. Craven Literacy is stepping up to the challenge with more focused help for tutors and students. We still strive to help adults achieve their personal literacy goals but with an eye on solid advancement in skill level.

2017 will be a learning year both for us and our students. Read more about WIOA here.

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We <3 Our Volunteers!

scenes from Volunteer Appreciation dinnerCraven Literacy Council celebrated National Literacy Month with a Volunteer Appreciation Dinner on September 13, 2016.  CLC has approximately 125 active tutors and other volunteers who are the heart of the organization.  These volunteers gave almost 13,000 hours to the organization last fiscal year.  They worked with students who needed help with reading, writing, speaking, technology, achieving citizenship, getting a drivers’ license, reading prescription labels, completing job applications and other forms, as well as helping with fundraisers, training new tutors, and raising awareness of adult literacy in our community.

Janet Peregoy was named the Volunteer of the Year for her outstanding service and advocacy of adult literacy in our community.  Four individuals: JoAnn Kerrick, Debi Lupia, Dorothea Neely and Mary Spooner were recognized for their induction into the Grand Club for achieving 1000 lifetime volunteer hours with Craven Literacy Council.

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New Leader at the Helm

Sandra McKinney, Executive DirectorWelcome, Sandra McKinney, the new  Executive Director of Craven Literacy Council.

It was hard saying good-bye to Donna Marshall, an 8-year veteran, who has led CLC  for the past 4 years. But it is exciting to look forward, too.

The Board of Directors has tapped a proven community leader in their hiring of Sandra McKinney as Executive Director. She brings an extensive background in administration in the nonprofit sector and a record of success in getting initiatives off the ground and flourishing. In particular, Sandra has experience with the development and implementation of special events to raise funds, increase community awareness, and identify partnership opportunities and nourish those relationships.

Stop by our office to say “hello” and join us in welcoming Sandra to Craven Literacy.

Meet Our Board

Board members at retreat
front, L-R: Kathy Carter, Alice Underhill, MaryLane Stine, Janet Peregoy, Sandy Epperson, Sandra McKinney (Executive Director). back, L-R: Jim Slaughter, Bill Rivenbark, JoAnn Kerrick, Glenn Clairmont, Donna Marshall (outgoing ED). not shown: Keith Merritt, Susan Moffat-Thomas, Karen Segal

The Board of Directors of Craven Literacy Council posed for this group photo at their annual retreat held May 19. From the newest directors who are only a few months into their service to veteran directors who have over 6 years on our Board, this is a committed, dedicated bunch.

Each year at the retreat the Board learns about some aspect of nonprofit operations from a guest speaker and finalizes the budget and strategic plan for the upcoming fiscal year. This year’s focus was on our literacy programs, which CLC staff presented in a fun and engaging manner.

Thank you to our wonderful Board of Directors for their work  improving literacy skills to empower adults and improve lives.

Happy Thanksgiving

Happy ThanksgivingWe here at Craven Literacy Council have much to be thankful for this Thanksgiving :

  • Our amazing adult learners who work hard each week to improve their literacy skills and their lives
  • Our wonderful volunteers who give generously of their time to work with area adults who are trying to better themselves through literacy
  • Our dedicated staff who coordinate all the learners and tutors, equipping them with the best in adult education practices
  • This wonderfully supportive community in which we live

Thank you all for helping make our little part of eastern North Carolina a better place for all of us. Join us in giving thanks this week!

November is Nonprofit Awareness Month!

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November is Nonprofit Awareness Month, and the NC Center for Nonprofits wants you to spread the word about all the good things nonprofits do for your state and community.

Did you know that nonprofits comprise more than 10% of all private sector employment in the country, accounting for 11.4 million employees according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics? In fact, if the nonprofit sector were a country, it would have the seventh largest economy in the world.

Here are 5 things your can do to boost awareness of and appreciation for nonprofits (courtesy of Unemployment Services Trust):

  • Share. Support nonprofit awareness via social media. Try simply sharing stories and images about a nonprofit you work for or volunteer with using Twitter, Facebook, Flickr and other platforms.
  • Volunteer. Get directly involved in the success of local nonprofits and share your experiences with others.
  • Give. Find a charity you care about, make a donation and encourage others to give. And don’t forget, your donation is typically tax deductible! The Association of Fundraising Professionals provides these 5 P’s of Wise Giving.
  • Learn. Find out 7 myths about nonprofits that you may not have known.  
  • Advocate. Find your elected officials online and make your cause known. Write them a letter, email or call them and take your messages and concerns to them.

 

 

 

Nonprofits Making a Difference in North Carolina

Nonprofits provide 1 out of 10 jobs in North Carolina by employing more than 400,000 people. Only the retail trade, manufacturing, and accommodation and food services industries are larger than the nonprofit sector.  Nonprofit employees’ incomes are put back into the economy in the form of income, sales and property taxes, and homes and consumer goods.

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Add the services provided by the approximately 2.5 million people who volunteer in NC nonprofits, and the impact is truly profound. From arts to education and more, the needed and valuable services provided by workers in the nonprofit sector enhance the fabric of NC communities.

Visit the N.C. Center for Nonprofits website to download their first ever comprehensive report about the economic impact of 501(c)(3) nonprofits in our state.